Swim the butterfly

How Difficult is it to Swim the Butterfly?

The Butterfly is often considered to be the hardest stroke to swim. 

Like all strokes, it comes down to technique. The key thing is to master the kick. Here is a short video explaining the key concepts:

Butterfly Kick Swimming Technique

 

Once you have mastered the kick the rhythm of the stroke feels more natural. 

Butterfly is one of the fastest strokes to swim and you get a great feeling of achievement if you manage to master this stroke. 

Being a ‘form’ stroke, there are set rules on how to swim the stroke.

Butterfly Stroke Rules

From the beginning of the first arm stroke after the start and each turn, the body shall be kept on the breast. It is not permitted to roll onto the back at any time, except at the turn after the touch of the wall where it is permissible to turn in any manner as long as the body is on the breast when leaving the wall.

Both arms shall be brought forward simultaneously over the water and brought backward simultaneously under the water through-out the race.

All up and down movements of the legs must be simultaneous. The legs or the feet need not be on the same level, but they shall not alternate in relation to each other. A breaststroke kicking movement is permitted for butterfly. A single breaststroke kick is permitted after the start and after each turn prior to the first arm pull and prior to the turn and the finish without an arm pull.

For Butterfly events up to and including 200m, only one breaststroke kick is permitted per arm pull, except that a single breaststroke kick is permitted prior to the turn and the finish without an arm pull.

For Butterfly events longer than 200m, up to two breaststroke kicks are permitted per arm pull, except that two breaststroke kicks are permitted prior to the turn and the finish without an armpull.

At each turn and at the finish of the race, the touch shall be made with both hands separated and simultaneously, at, above or below the water surface.

At the start and at turns, a swimmer is permitted one or more leg kicks and one arm pull under the water, which must bring them to the surface. It shall be permissible for a swimmer to be completely submerged for a distance of not more than 15 metres after the start and after each turn. By that point, the head must have broken the surface. The swimmer must remain on the surface until the next turn or finish.

As with all other strokes, there are rules for swimmers, who are physically unable to swim the stroke in accordance with the rules above. 
Masters Swimming Australia has the full set of swimming stroke rules on their website.

Want to Test Your Butterfly?

Why not test your butterfly skills at a swim meet?

To find out more about Masters swim meets, click HERE

You need to be a member of a Masters swimming club to participate. 

Why not join today?

Join Redcliffe Peninsula Masters Swimming Club